Read Part 1: Estimating the Structural Deficit in Wyoming
We need your help. Rate bills according to a standard of liberty.
These blogs focus on current events and topics that will help your understanding of them.
Your contribution helps to keep us moving forward and fighting for our freedoms.
Please take a moment to sign up for the Republic Free Choice Newsletter.
Liking us on facebook will keep you up-to-date on current events that we are keeping our resources on.

Blogging with RFC

Please enjoy and comment on our blogs.

Recent blog posts
Posted by on in Wyoming Issues
The Current State of the U.S. Economy, Part 2

Yesterday I reported some data showing that the U.S. economy is in good shape from a structural viewpoint. Household spending and business investments - domestic private-sector activity - today absorb a larger share of output than they did under the Bush Jr. administration. Government consumption and investment spending has taken a step back, and the foreign trade balance is in better shape today than at the height of the Bush business cycle.

Today, let's look at the same macroeconomic data from another perspective. 

2. A strong growth pattern

In terms of inflation-adjusted growth, the U.S. economy is doing relatively well. GDP growht is not great - but these numbers from 2009-2014 are far better than what we can find anywhere in the developed world:

  • 2009 -2.76 percent
  • 2010 2.53 percent
  • 2011 1.6 percent
  • 2012 2.32 percent
  • 2013 2.09 percent
  • 2014 2.41 percent

When an economy grows faster than two percent per year it provides opportunities for people to achieve a standard of living higher than what previous generations have accomplished. Growth below causes stagnation or even a decline in the average standard of living.* From this perspective the American economy is just about keeping its nose above the water. It could do much better, but two factors are holding us back: the Obama administration's affinity for heavy-handed regulations, and the combined global effects of a China in recession, a Europe in stagnation and a Russia in Ukraine.

In other words, as the sole engine pulling the industrialized world forward, the United States is doing a reasonably good job. More details from the GDP growth numbers reinforce this conclusion. There is, e.g., private consumption which over the past three years has averaged 2.1 percent in annual growth. For 2014, though, the preliminary growth rate was 2.5 percent, a good but not excellent number. Underneath it, though, is some good news: spending on durable goods - household appliances, automobiles etc - has averaged 6.5 percent per year since 2012. This means two things: American families are improving their credit scores again after taking a beating in the trough of the Great Recession; and they are more optimistic about the future.

This optimism is corroborated by encouraging employment, which we will get to in the fourth and last part of this series.

But there is even more good news in the GDP growth numbers. Gross fixed capital formation (GFCF or business investments) has averaged a growth rate of 5.7 percent per year over the past three years. Even better: the growth rate is stabilizing. In the figure above, investments fluctuate wildly:

  • Down 26.4 percent in Q2 of 2009;
  • Up 21.1 percent in Q3 od 2010;
  • Growth plummets to 1.3 percent in Q3 2011;
  • Next growth peak is 13.5 percentin Q1 2012.

From thereon the amplitude declines, forming a "confidence cone" where the annual rate stabilizes around 5.7 percent per year. A good number, the stability of which makes it even more impressive.

At the same time, no story of capital formation is complete without a detailed look at what kinds of investments businesses make. Here, again, there is an encouraging pattern of stability. Fixed investment falls into two categories, non-residential and residential, with the former constituting about 80 percent of total fixed investment. In this group spending is divided into structures, equipment and intellectual property products. Again the proportions between the different categories remain stable over time, with the equipment category representing 45-47 percent of non-residential investments. 

While homes construction was weak in 2014 - growing by only 1.64 percent - it finished strongly in the fourth quarter at 2.6 percent over Q4 2013. But the residential investment numbers for 2012 and 2013 were downright impressive: 13.5 and 12 percent, respectively.

Finally, a word about government spending. Many people unfamiliar with national accounts make the mistake of looking at total government outlays as share of GDP, whereupon they understandably get outraged about how big government is. However, in order to understand the role of government properly one has to remove the financial transactions from government spending: GDP only consists of payments for work - by labor or capital - or for products. A financial transaction such as a cash entitlement does not pay for work or products, and therefore has no place in GDP. 

The government spending included in GDP is payments for teachers in public school, police officers and tax collectors, as well as products such as tasty lunches for middle-school kids and gasoline for the presidential motorcade. It is also investments such as new highways and faster trucks for the postal service. 

This kind of government spending has actually been shrinking in the past few years:

  • 2011 -3.04 percent;
  • 2012 -1.45 percent;
  • 2013 -1.49 percent; and
  • 2014 -0.18 percent. 

All in all, then, the U.S. economy is in reasonably good shape. This does not mean that cash entitlements such as food stamps are not a problem. They are. But with this stable macroeconomic foundation the U.S. economy is well suited to handle reforms to entitlement programs.

Check back tomorrow Friday for the third of a total of four installments in this article series.

 

Hits: 12

Over the last few months I have been researching juvenile justice issues with a particular focus on how to keep kids out of jail. While writing about my findings I have explored the disturbing national phenomenon of extremely young kids being arrested. This research has also uncovered the troubling connection between police officers (SROs) stationed in schools and elevated arrests and incarcerations of juveniles from these schools. Perhaps most horrifying has been the discovery that the fastest growing segment of police brutality and abuse is among School Resource Officers.

Tagged in: Juvenile Justice
Posted by on in Wyoming Issues
The Current State of the U.S. Economy, Part 1

President Obama gets a lot of criticism from libertarians and conservatives. Some of that criticism is well deserved, but there are areas where the president has earned more accolades than he gets. 

In fact, if you listen to the common conservative wisdom about Obama, we have an economy that is on the verge of being socialized. When it comes to regulatory incursions and irresponsible environmental policies, Obama's critics are indeed correct. That includes the legislative monstrosity known as the Affordable Care Act.

Posted by on in Wyoming Issues

I am a libertarian.

It is easy to be a libertarian. All you have to do is sound off about how outraged you are about how big, wasteful and intrusive government is. You spice up your rhetoric with some googled quotes from Murray Rothbard, Ludwig von Mises and Herman Hoppe (the man who called Milton Friedman a “socialist”…) and go home and feel accomplished.

The Shame on U.S.report has recently recommended that Congress withhold all federal child welfare funds in order to compel states to comply with child welfare laws and standards that the authors say are being violated in every state. The Children’s Advocacy Instituteof the San Diego School of Law in conjunction with First Star, a non-profit child abuse prevention advocacy group presented an extensive report to congress in January 2015. The report is entitled Shame on U.S.: Failings by All Three Branches of our Federal Government Leave Abused and Neglected Children Vulnerable to Further Harm.

Tagged in: Juvenile Justice

What do you think?

Do you believe that Medicaid expansion programs will solve the exisiting problems with Medicaid?
  • Votes: 0%
  • Votes: 0%
  • Votes: 0%
Total Votes:
First Vote:
Last Vote:
Search - Ohanah
Search - Easy Blog Comment
Search - Easy Blog
Search - Categories
Search - Contacts
Search - Content
Search - Newsfeeds
Search - Weblinks
Search - JEvents

Events Calendar

Social Media

Contribute

Newsletter